Geyser Spring Trail

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Welcome back, I guess you wanted to hear about another hike!! Ok, this time we will talk about a nice relatively short hike to the ONLY geyser in Colorado. So what do you guess the trail is called, yup, Geyser Springs Trail.

  We did this hike with our good friends Bob & Karen and their two four legged kids Buddy & Elsa who if you have seen much of our blog in the past we are sure you have heard about many times. Elsa is actually their son’s dog who is stationed up in Alaska for a bit so Bob & Karen are doing an extended dog sitting gig but she’s a good girl so she was fun to have along.  

 To get to the trailhead from our campground we drove HWY 145 to about 12 miles beyond the town of Dolores until we reached the NFSR #535 which is a pretty well maintained gravel road and drove it 23 miles until we reached the trailhead parking lot. If you know the area the Trailhead is just 2 miles south of the town of Dunton.

 The trail starts by crossing the West Dolores River by way of a pretty new footbridge from the looks of it and then meanders upwards on the gently sloped trail through the Aspens and through a few very pretty meadows.

 We mentioned that it’s a pretty short hike at roughly 2.5 miles round trip I guess BUT because it is a constant uphill all the way in at the elevation of 8700ft it’s still some good exercise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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As you work your way up you will find some signs of old mining activity but they were well posted with “Do not enter signs” which we obeyed of course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The hike up was very pretty and we had a fantastic sunny day to do it on which made the views spectacular but of course the prize at the end of the trail was the geyser.

 We have traveled around and have seen some geysers and even though this is considered a geyser we almost would call it a hot spring because what we found was a small pool fed by a geyser that erupts every 30 to 40 minutes but the eruption is more of a boiling for 10 to 15 minutes, nothing shooting into the air like you might think. But it was very pretty none the less.

 After spending some time at the geyser we made our way back down to the footbridge at the bottom, sat on the rocks by the river and had our lunches while taking in the views around us.

 Once we finished lunch we decided to continue on to the town of Dunton to see what it had to share, which was a few building behind a locked gate LOL!!! So we decided to just continue on 38 which was a continuation of the gravel road we drove getting to the trailhead except it became less maintained but still a fine road that offered up some great color as we drove through the aspen’s.

 Eventually 38 took us back down to HWY 145 which we took back through the towns of Rico and Delores and back to our campground. A pretty darn day outing.

 Once home we chilled for a bit, had our dinners and gathered for an evening happy hour around the fire pit. A fine day for sure.  

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