A visit to St. George

Sunday (4/2) played out pretty much as I mentioned in our last update, after my morning routine I jumped in the truck and headed to the RC Airfield just after 7am to fly and get a little BSing in with the guys for a couple hours while Diane stayed home to shower and have the slow paced morning she prefers.

 After flying I headed home to pick up Diane and we headed out for a day trip to ST. George. To get there we drove I-15 which actually took us through a very nice twisty canyon section with some great views. Unfortunately we are not very good at getting pictures from a moving vehicle and there are not many turnouts but we did get a couple shots that do not do it justice.

I-15 headed to St George

I-15 headed to St George

I-15 headed to St George

I-15 headed to St George

I-15 headed to St George

I-15 headed to St George

 One thing about going to St. George on a Sunday is the streets are pretty empty but a lot of stuff is closed up. This suited us well because this was mainly a driving tour anyway, we planned to make a return trip in the upcoming days

 After driving around town for a bit our first stop was at the Brigham Young Winter House which after his death went through several ownerships before it was purchased by the Mormon Church and opened to the public as a museum, with free guided tours. Because of the changes in ownership, many of the original pieces of furniture were lost but many original pieces are still there.

Brigham Young, as the locals say, was St. George’s first snowbird. As Young aged and began suffering from arthritis he found that St. George’s warm & dry winters eased his discomfort. Of course being RVer’s we found this amusing and could relate 100%.

Brigham Young winter home from the side

Brigham Young winter home from the side

 As we walked around the house admiring the small orchard and gardens that surrounded the house on 3 sides we realized that we could take a free guided tour which of course we did.

 The original portion of his home was begun in 1869 and completed in 1871. The front addition—what most would call the main part of the house—was completed in 1873.

The shorter section of the house was the original area before they built on.

The shorter section of the house was the original area before they built on.

 The house is constructed of adobe, plaster and local rock which was common in Utah at the time. The home has a large wrap-around front porches, thick walls, a vegetable storage room in the basement, and three bedrooms. It also had a detached office with telegraph station, and a large office-style master bedroom upstairs.

Brigham Young Winter Home in St George

Brigham Young Winter Home in St George

After our tour we jumped in the truck and headed to the St. George Temple of the LDS and did a walk around tour. The grounds were immaculate and the Temple impressive but we don’t claim to know a bunch about this religion so how about we just share some facts we found on the internet. Diane wanted me to go up the steps so she could take a picture but I figured I would burst into flames and fall into a pile of ashes so I skipped the opportunity.

St George LDS Temple

St George LDS Temple

 The St. George Utah Temple is the oldest operating temple of the Church and was the first built in Utah.

The St. George Utah Temple was originally named the St. George Temple.

The St. George Utah Temple is the only temple completed during Brigham Young’s 30-year tenure as president of the Church.

With a total of 18 sealing rooms (not all are in active use), the St. George Utah Temple has more sealing rooms than any other temple in the Church.

The swampy ground chosen for the St. George Utah Temple was packed with volcanic rock using a cannon as a pile driver, on display in the visitors’ center.

The St. George Utah Temple was originally patterned after the Kirtland and Nauvoo Temples with two large assembly halls featuring a set of pulpits at each end.

The original tower of the St. George Utah Temple fell casualty to a lightning storm about a year after the dedication, leaving it badly damaged. A new tower was completed several years later, taller and more majestic than the first.

The St. George Utah Temple was privately dedicated on January 1, 1877, in a series of three dedicatory prayers: the baptistry by Wilford Woodruff, the main floor by Erastus Snow, and the sealing room by Brigham Young, Jr.

The St. George Utah Temple is the first temple where endowments for the dead were performed.

The Founding Fathers of the United States of America appeared twice to Wilford Woodruff in the St. George Utah Temple asking why their temple work had yet not been performed on their behalves. A striking painting depicting this singular event hangs in the temple lobby (That We May be Redeemed by Harold I. Hopkinson).

In November 1928, fire broke out, destroying the St. George Utah Temple annex. All records and furnishings were saved. Today’s annex, located on the north side of the temple, was constructed in the 1950s and serves as the entrance to the temple.

The St. George Utah Temple was extensively remodeled for over a year from 1937 to 1938. The lower hall was permanently divided into progressive-style muraled endowment rooms.

Following a second major renovation project, the St. George Utah Temple nearly doubled its 56,062 square feet. It was opened to the public for an open house and formally rededicated in 1975. The progressive-style ordinance rooms that were used to present 3 live-acting endowment sessions a day, were replaced with three motion-picture ordinance rooms that accommodated 14 sessions a day.

The back side of the Temple

The back side of the Temple

 Ok, are you still with us??!!??!! LOL!! Anyway, after the Temple we headed out to find Pioneer Park where we took in some great views over the city.

Looking over St George. You can see the Temple in the middle of the picture

Looking over St George. You can see the Temple in the middle of the picture

 After Pioneer Park we decided to take a different way back to Mesquite instead of the freeway so we found our way to HWY 8 which was a lot longer and slower way home but took us through some new territory.

 Our first stop on this new route was Kayenta Art Village just outside Santa Clara where a few art galleries, studios, a theatre, a few gift shops and a restaurant sit amongst a neighborhood that is described as “A Community that is a tranquil enclave surrounded by protected lands. A 2,000 acre master planned community of fine homes, custom building sites and community amenities that is a unique departure from the norm, focused on moderate land use, moderate-sustainable growth, and an appreciation for our magnificent natural setting.” Ok, I guess but I found it to be houses with overgrown brush growing right up to the houses which would drive me bonkers. But I’m a firm believer of different strokes for different folks.

Kayenta Art Village

Kayenta Art Village

Kayenta Art Village

Kayenta Art Village

 After Kayenta we made a quick stop at Ivan’s Reservoir which wasn’t very big at all but seemed to be a popular place for families in the area.

Ivan's Reservoir

Ivan’s Reservoir

 

Then we were off again headed to Gunlock State Park. Our State Park adventure really just entailed a driving tour and a quick stop to snap a picture. We did see a few people on the lake in small boats fishing but nothing else seemed to be going on.

Gunlock State Park

Gunlock State Park

 From Gunlock we just drove backcountry roads until we once again connected with I-15 and we continued back to Mesquite where we stopped off at Panda Garden Chinese restaurant for a bite to eat before heading home for the evening. Phew, that was a long day.

 Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday we didn’t really do much. Monday it blew like the dickens and rained off and on, Tuesday we did a little shopping and spent some time at the casino’s making our contribution to the community and Wednesday I washed the truck and took some time to vacuum a few bays in the basement of the motorhome while Diane tinkered inside. Hey, every day can’t be an adventure LOL!!

 Thursday we planned to make another run to St George to do a little hiking but we will leave that for our next update in fear that we have already made this one too long. So until then stay warm and dry.   

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4 Responses to A visit to St. George

  1. colibabas says:

    You sure packed a lot in one day! Love that picture of Diane standing in the art work.

  2. Dave thanks for the look at St. George. We’ll be spending the month of may in Hurricane, UT and using it as a basecamp to explore the surrounding areas. Your review gives us a few spots to see while in the area.

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