St Augustine Florida

On our last update before our 1 year review we mentioned we had arrived in St. Augustine Florida on Friday 11/8/13. We pretty much hung around camp on Friday and tried to heal so no need to talk about that.

Friday night between Diane’s toe and my back it was a rough one for both of us. Diane tried to rig up some sort of tent under the covers to keep them from touching her smashed toe and every time I would move I was in pain and woke up numerous times by my back pain. So Saturday morning we had a very slow start to the day LOL!!

We did however finally decide to jump in the Jeep and headed out to explore. We headed straight downtown where of course we want to explore the most. As soon as we reached it we were greeted with stop and go traffic, foot traffic that was overflowing off the sidewalks and the apparent lack of places to park.

It turned out there was a Pirate type event going on which drew a huge crowd and combined with it being a holiday weekend the place was a zoo!!

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We soon decided to hold off on downtown until Monday when we were certain the crowds would be subsided. So we headed out of town for a drive through the country side. It seems we tend to kick back on the weekends and enjoy sightseeing on weekdays when it is less crowded.

We had hoped to drive along the beach and enjoy the views because walking on them with Diane’s open wound on her toe was not going to happen. But unfortunately after driving miles and miles along the coastline we were only able to catch a couple brief glimpses of the water. Housing is so tight along the shore that the ocean is all blocked from the road.

Even without the view of the ocean we enjoyed our drive.

Sunday morning when coming back from a walk we noticed a couple people by our RV as we approached. It turned out to be Daune & Chris. They are members of the Tiffin Forum that I frequent and knew we were in town and came by to visit!!

It was a very pleasant surprise and we enjoyed meeting and chatting with them a lot. They now live in St Augustine and gave us a few tips about the area and other places in Florida. Hopefully we will have a chance to meet up again.  They have an RV and travel a number of months throughout the year.

After our visit we went for another drive and picked up some dog food for Jack. So he is set for another month. Lucky boy.

Monday 11/11/13 we were pretty excited to head back downtown so we set the alarm for 6:30 to get a jump on the day. We were able to get through our morning routine and made it to the Old Town Trolley stop to purchase our tickets shortly after nine.

One of the trolley's we rode. We need a motorhome like that. It certainly went down some narrow roads.

One of the trolley’s we rode. We need a motorhome like that. It certainly went down some narrow roads.

The trolley tickets are a much better deal here in St. Augustine than they were in Savannah. They cost $23 each here and they are good for 5 days!!! Compared to the $27 each in Savannah that were only good for one day it’s an exceptional deal!! Plus you can park in their lot for free and not worry about it.

Peaceful and serene, the Mission of Nombre de Dios. The Great Cross, which rises 208 feet, was erected in 1965 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the first parish mass. Shrine of Lady of La Leche in St. Augustine The chapel, which is dedicated to Our Lady of La Leche, is a shrine which houses an exquisitely detailed carved statue of Mary nursing the baby Jesus. Established in 1615, many people have traveled here to pray for mothers and mothers-to-be.

Peaceful and serene, the Mission of Nombre de Dios. The Great Cross, which rises 208 feet, was erected in 1965 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the first parish mass. Shrine of Lady of La Leche in St. Augustine The chapel, which is dedicated to Our Lady of La Leche, is a shrine which houses an exquisitely detailed carved statue of Mary nursing the baby Jesus. Established in 1615, many people have traveled here to pray for mothers and mothers-to-be.

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Once we jumped on the trolley we rode the entire narrated loop and Diane made notes of which stops were most interesting to us. One problem,,, there are a lot of things of interest in St. Augustine so her list was long LOL!!!

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We spent 6 hours touring on Monday and then another 6 hours on Tuesday and still have a couple things left we want to see.

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The entrance to the college

The entrance to the college

Flagler College, built by Flagler a Spanish Renaissance architecture building situated on the grounds of the original Ponce de Leon Hotel. The hotel was built in 1888 and was known for its opulent setting and luxurious amenities and being the winter playground for the rich and famous.

Flagler College, built by Flagler a Spanish Renaissance architecture building situated on the grounds of the original Ponce de Leon Hotel. The hotel was built in 1888 and was known for its opulent setting and luxurious amenities and being the winter playground for the rich and famous.

The front courtyard of the college

The front courtyard of the college

A small area on the grounds of the college.

A small area on the grounds of the college.

Around 1 o’clock we decided to grab some lunch so we stopped at the Florida Cracker. We ended up sitting at the bar to eat. While waiting for our food we talked with Alex, our waiter, and found out he was about to pack up his chickens, goats and bee’s and move to Nevada and start up a farm.

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The Alcazar Hotel

The Alcazar Hotel

While talking about growing his own food Diane asked if he had heard of Vermicomposting. And it turned out that he has Red Wiggler worms and is very interested in it!!! Diane and her friend Sheryl had a small business while we had the sticks and brick and sold worm castings to a couple retail stores.

Martin Luther King was hidden in this house while visiting S. Augustine

Martin Luther King was hidden in this house while visiting S. Augustine.

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An 11-block stretch of shops, restaurants and historic sites. No need to worry about traffic because there is none since this area is a designated walking mall. On old St. George Street, in the heart of historic St. Augustine, neat little shops, museums, historic buildings and interesting views are on every corner.

An 11-block stretch of shops, restaurants and historic sites. No need to worry about traffic because there is none since this area is a designated walking mall. On old St. George Street, in the heart of historic St. Augustine, neat little shops, museums, historic buildings and interesting views are on every corner.

What’s the odds of running into someone like that??!! I got a pretty good kick out of listening to them go on and on about worms and they had a good time as well. In fact the food started building up in the window by the time Alex realized it LOL!!

The museum is the original Ripley’s Believe it or Not, opening in 1950 just a few months after Robert Ripley’s death.

The museum is the original Ripley’s Believe it or Not, opening in 1950 just a few months after Robert Ripley’s death.

They had to add the shrubs around the statue because it caused traffic issues before they were required LOL!!

They had to add the shrubs around the statue because it caused traffic issues before they were required LOL!!

An exact replica of Michelangelo's "David," an 18-foot tall hand-carved marble statue weighing 20,000 pounds has made its way to Castle Warden, home of Ripley's Believe It or Not! The Statue of David. It is one of only two in the world carved as the original was - from a solid piece of pure Carrara Marble quarried from Pietra Santa in Tuscany, Italy. It's the same quarry where Michelangelo acquired the marble for his masterpiece.

An exact replica of Michelangelo’s “David,” an 18-foot tall hand-carved marble statue weighing 20,000 pounds has made its way to Castle Warden, home of Ripley’s Believe It or Not! The Statue of David. It is one of only two in the world carved as the original was – from a solid piece of pure Carrara Marble quarried from Pietra Santa in Tuscany, Italy. It’s the same quarry where Michelangelo acquired the marble for his masterpiece.

This statue is made entirely of 1950's and 1960's chrome automobile bumpers.

This statue is made entirely of 1950’s and 1960’s chrome automobile bumpers.

Anyway we had a very good meal and then said our so longs to Alex and went on our way.

St. Augustine is another one of those places that there would be no way to put the entire experience on paper, so we will share some picture and a couple links that you can go to if you’re interested.

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Diane working her way into what once was the gunpowder room

Diane working her way into what once was the gunpowder room

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This is a Hot Shot Furnace for heating a cannon ball so when it is shot at a wooden ship it would set it on fire.

This is a Hot Shot Furnace for heating a cannon ball so when it is shot at a wooden ship it would set it on fire.

The dry moat around the fort

The dry moat around the fort

This guy was headed out to do a flint lock rifle demo!!

This guy was headed out to do a flint lock rifle demo!!

And BANG!!!

And BANG!!!

And we took soooo many pictures it’s very hard to narrow them down to just a few to show on the blog. We must have 50 pictures of the College and the fort alone!!!

http://www.exploresouthernhistory.com/staugustine1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Augustine,_Florida

http://fcit.usf.edu/florida/docs/s/staug04.htm

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The Villa Zorayda Museum. Originally called the Zorayda Castle, the building was constructed in 1883 by Franklin Smith, an architect from Boston. Smith built the residence as a winter home and designed it to be a scaled-down replica of the Alhambra Palace in Spain. His style of architecture included using coquina shells mixed with poured concrete and it is said that his method had a powerful impact on later buildings that were constructed in St. Augustine.

The Villa Zorayda Museum. Originally called the Zorayda Castle, the building was constructed in 1883 by Franklin Smith, an architect from Boston. Smith built the residence as a winter home and designed it to be a scaled-down replica of the Alhambra Palace in Spain. His style of architecture included using coquina shells mixed with poured concrete and it is said that his method had a powerful impact on later buildings that were constructed in St. Augustine.

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One thing was pretty apparent. There seems to be a little history battle between St Augustine and Jamestown on who was the first city in the USA LOL!! We have head story after story about how St Augustine was settled in 1565, 42 years before Jamestown and 55 years before Plymouth.

The Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church was built by Henry Flagler in 1889. It is one of his most significant projects, because it was constructed as a memorial to Flagler’s only daughter, Jenny. Flagler’s masterpiece features hand-carved Santo Domino mahogany, detailed terra cotta frieze work by Italian artists and a massive copper dome.

The Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church was built by Henry Flagler in 1889. It is one of his most significant projects, because it was constructed as a memorial to Flagler’s only daughter, Jenny. Flagler’s masterpiece features hand-carved Santo Domino mahogany, detailed terra cotta frieze work by Italian artists and a massive copper dome.

The front of the Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church

The front of the Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church

Inside the Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church

Inside the Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church

Inside the Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church

Inside the Flagler Memorial Presbyterian Church

Once again we will bombard you with pictures LOL!!

I will say that St Augustine has made it to our favorites list for sure!! And we really enjoyed walking around taking in the sights. This is one stop that was high on our list of places to visit when we hit the road. Scratch another one off the bucket list!!

Made completely by hand, the Oldest Wooden Schoolhouse is an architectural and historical icon in St. Augustine. It is constructed of Red cedar and cypress along with wooden pegs. IT’s dated back to the early 18th century. Originally the building had no electricity, no running water, no kitchen or bathroom. The kitchen was purposely put in a separate building to avoid the dangers of fire.

Made completely by hand, the Oldest Wooden Schoolhouse is an architectural and historical icon in St. Augustine. It is constructed of Red cedar and cypress along with wooden pegs. IT’s dated back to the early 18th century. Originally the building had no electricity, no running water, no kitchen or bathroom. The kitchen was purposely put in a separate building to avoid the dangers of fire.

The Old City Gates were at one time the only entrance into St. Augustine. The two ancient columns made of stone were built in 1808 as a line of defense for the city.

The Old City Gates were at one time the only entrance into St. Augustine. The two ancient columns made of stone were built in 1808 as a line of defense for the city.

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The Old Jail. Built in 1891

The Old Jail. Built in 1891

The back of the Old Jail

The back of the Old Jail

We are going to hang around St Augustine until Friday when we will pack up and head to Seffner just outside of Tampa.

The temps are supposed to cool down until then and a little threat of rain is in the forecast so I don’t know for sure just what we will do. I know we want to wash the coach and give Jack a bath for sure. So there may not be much to update until after we get to our next spot.

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One Response to St Augustine Florida

  1. Pingback: Believe it or not: Replica of Michelangelo’s David graces Florida “Odditorium” | Art is Life

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