A tour day of Williamsburg Virginia

Monday 9/23/13 we woke to another sunny day and decided to get a early start and head into Williamsburg to check out the town.

Once there we found a short term parking area and started walking. Not knowing just what we would find we figured the 2 hour parking might work out just fine. Wrong!!

A few more shops in downtown Williamsburg

A few more shops in downtown Williamsburg

A couple of shops in downtown Williamsburg

A couple of shops in downtown Williamsburg

Williamsburg was founded as the capital of the Virginia Colony in 1699. The original capital, Jamestown was the first permanent English-speaking settlement in the New World founded in 1607. Colonial leaders petitioned the Virginia Assembly to relocate the capital from Jamestown to Middle Plantation, five miles inland between the James and the York Rivers. The new city was renamed Williamsburg in honor of England’s reigning monarch, King William III. Williamsburg celebrated its 300th Anniversary in 1999.

This was the capitol building for the 13 colonies.

This was the capitol building for the 13 colonies.

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Williamsburg was one of America’s first planned cities. Laid out in 1699 under the supervision of Governor Francis Nicholson, it was to be a “new and well-ordered city” suitable for the capital of the largest and most populous of the British colonies in America. A succession of capitol buildings became home to the oldest legislative assembly in the New World. The young city grew quickly into the center of political, religious, economic and social life in Virginia.

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They are looking for evidence of the Market House built in 1757

They are looking for evidence of the Market House built in 1757

Williamsburg also became a center of learning. Famous political leaders emerged from the College of William and Mary, (which was founded in 1693), such as Presidents Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and John Tyler. The first hospital established in America for the care and treatment of mental illness was founded in Williamsburg in 1773. General George Washington assembled the Continental Army in Williamsburg in 1781 for the siege of nearby Yorktown and the winning of American independence.

The Magazine and Guard House built in 1715

The Magazine and Guard House built in 1715

The Payton Randolph house

The Payton Randolph house

The Capital was again moved in 1780, this time up the James River to Richmond, where it remains today. Williamsburg reverted to a quiet college town and rural county seat. In retrospect, Williamsburg’s loss of capital city status was its salvation as many 18th century buildings survived into the early twentieth century. The Restoration of Williamsburg began in 1926, after the Rector of Bruton Parish Church, the Reverend Doctor W. A. R. Goodwin, brought the city’s importance to the attention of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who then funded and led the massive reconstruction of the 18th century city we see today. National attention soon focused on the restoration effort. During a landmark visit in 1934, Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed it’s main thoroughfare, the Duke of Gloucester Street, “the most historic avenue in America.” The locals know it as (Dog Street).

The Governors Palace was built in 1722 but burned down while being used as a hospital in 1781 but was rebuilt.

The Governors Palace was built in 1722 but burned down while being used as a hospital in 1781 but was rebuilt.

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Today, Williamsburg is known internationally as the premier center for the preservation and interpretation of American colonial history: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation; and as the home of the nation’s premier small public university: The College of William and Mary.

I just thought it was a nice look

I just thought it was a nice look

Those are pomegranate growing on that tree!! We had never seen that before.

Those are pomegranate growing on that tree!! We had never seen that before.

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The downtown area was interesting to walk through. Many people were dressed in garb from the period and if you asked them questioned would answer in the tongue of the period as well.

 

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Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

One guy sitting on a front porch called me over and offered me a haircut for 5 pence. I should have taken him up on the offer,,, I’m due a haircut LOL!!

This guy wanted to give me a haircut

This guy wanted to give me a haircut

 

Before we knew it we had walked around 2 hours and still had lots to see so we went back to the Jeep and moved it to a hourly parking area then started out again. By that time it was time for some lunch so we ate at a place called The Trellis. Diane had a soft crab BLT and I had a oyster sandwich.

We ate lunch here,, The Trellis

We ate lunch here,, The Trellis

After lunch we continued our walking tour and walked around a couple more hours. Then headed home where we chatted with a few other RVers, had dinner and took it easy the remainder of the night.

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