Touring Ronks and Lititz

Wednesday 8/21/13 after or morning routine we headed up the street into  town to browse the many small shops and vendors spread out through town. There are a bunch of places located in the Kitchen Kettle Village. There are over 40 shops filled with homemade Lancaster County foods, make your home feel homey type shops, clothing shops, a neat custom sign shop (which we just might take advantage of),, candle shops, you can jump on a buggy and do a tour of town,, a leather shop, pet shop, art gallery, a furniture shop that I liked allot and on and on. Oh,, did I mention FOOD!! There is one shop in particular that must have had over 200 salsa’s and as many jams and EVEY ONE HAD SAMPLES AVAILABLE!!! I could have spent hours in there LOL!!

They must have had 500 things you could sample

They must have had 500 things you could sample

I really liked that chair!!

I really liked that chair!!

We have been talking about getting a battery operated candle for the motorhome for some time and we finally pulled the trigger and bought one along with a nice vase and some potpourri for it to sit in. Plus it has a remote control!! Perfect,, another remote to deal with LOL!!

IMG_7202

I love the way our new simpler life is. Not that long ago most of the toys we bought costs thousands of dollars and didn’t really make us any happier than we are now by buying a simple candle. Life is good.

After the shopping center we walked up the street and checker out a few more shops before jumping in the jeep and heading to the next little town up the road called Bird in Hand where we putted around in a few more shops and had lunch at a great bakery called,,, Bird in Hand Bakery of course. Oh,, and I guess we might have picked up a few little treats while there. But only a few because we figured we would be back to get more fresh stuff in a few days LOL!!

Then we headed back to Intercourse and visited a cannery and a great meat shop called Stoltzfus Meats. It had a lot more to it than meats but we took advantage and bought a couple nice pork chops to toss on the BBQ for dinner. Here is a link to the shop for fun.

http://www.stoltzfusmeats.com/about-stoltzfus-meats.php

I can tell you right now that we will be digging into our fat cloths by the time we leave this area.

Then we headed home, had a great dinner and relaxed the rest of the evening.

======================================================

Thursday 8/22/13 we took of headed for a town called Lititz. Lititz is a picture-perfect representative of small town America. The town is known for picturesque, tree-lined streets, unique shops, cafés, architecture, and a friendly atmosphere. The architecture is a combination of English, German, and Victorian styles. And was established in 1749. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s Lititz was a summer resort. People came here for what they believed were medicinal properties in Lititz Springs, which is the largest limestone spring in Pennsylvania.

IMG_7194

IMG_7198

Just another shot downtown

Just another shot downtown

We didn’t want to visit Lititz for the springs, even though it might not be a bad idea but we wanted to visit the town because In February 2013 Lititz was voted the “Coolest Small Town in America” And because of the 1st pretzel shop in America and a chocolate factory.

Julius Sturgis Pretzel Bakery The first pretzel bakery in the New World

Julius Sturgis Pretzel Bakery. The first pretzel bakery in the New World

Our 1st stop was the Julius Sturgis pretzel shop. In 1850, Julius Sturgis ran a bread bakery in Lititz, Pennsylvania. And in 1861, after eleven years as a baker, Julius stopped making bread and established the first commercial pretzel bakery in America.

This is the Dough Barrel where the flour, water & yeast stock was mixed to a fairly stiff consistency and left to rise over night called (sponging)

This is the Dough Barrel where the flour, water & yeast stock was mixed to a fairly stiff consistency and left to rise over night called (sponging)

After the pretzels were twisted and before they baked they were placed on these racks to rise. After they set they were carried to the ovens to be backed.

After the pretzels were twisted and before they baked they were placed on these racks to rise. After they set they were carried to the ovens to be backed.

The Sturgis family continues to bake pretzels today, using the same old-fashioned recipe and methods established by Julius Sturgis in 1861.

These ovens were stoked with either wood or coal to a temp of 550 degrees. The pretzels were backed for 10 min. then removed to the kilns upstairs for drying and packaging

These ovens were stoked with either wood or coal to a temp of 550 degrees. The pretzels were backed for 10 min. then removed to the kilns upstairs for drying and packaging

In addition to being the site of America’s first commercial pretzel bakery, the building. holds an even longer history. Built in 1784 by Peter Kreiter, the house is one of the original structures in Lititz. The sturdy stone house was built from stones dug from the street itself and timber hewed from the surrounding forest.

Practicing pretzel making skills!!!

Practicing pretzel making skills!!!

Here are the pretzels Diane and I made!!

Here are the pretzels Diane and I made!!

Of course the factory now is located outside of town and is lodged in a building the size of a football field. And the art of making pretzels by hand is long gone. EXCEPT FOR TODAY!!!! During our tour we made a pretzel!!

The tour was only 20 minutes but told a pretty good story and we were able to see how they made them by hand and then went to the wood or coal fired ovens and then put in racks and stored. Pretzels were also a big thing during the Civil War and was a big boost for the Sturgis pretzel factories business.

Pretzels have an ancient history, but the origin of the pretzel remains a mystery. There are many stories as to how the first pretzel was created, the most common being that in 610 A.D. Italian monks used scraps of dough to form the shape of children’s arms in prayer, with three holes to represent the Christian Trinity. They were called “pretiola” in Latin or “little reward” and were given to children who learned their bible verses and prayers.

Does the shape of my arms remind you of a pretzel ??

Does the shape of my arms remind you of a pretzel ??

Back then they crossed there arms over there chest during prayer.

Another tour that we enjoyed.

Then off to the Wilbur Chocolate Factory. Unfortunately there were no tours like we thought there would be but I guess because we were there and we have been told that the Wilbur Chocolate nuggets were possibly better than the Hershey Kisses that we just HAD to get some to try. It’s the least we could do if we couldn’t take a tour LOL!! Between visiting the museum which had some pretty neat things all related to chocolate of course and a few goodies we picked up we enjoyed our short visit. Here is a link to Wilbur Chocolate if your interested.

http://www.wilburbuds.com/docs/history.html

IMG_7179

Just a few of the chocolate molds

Just a few of the chocolate molds

Old containers

Old containers

IMG_7183 IMG_7184

Mmmmm,, some goodies

Mmmmm,, some goodies

IMG_7186

Then it was time to stroll the streets and find a place for lunch. We found a nice place called General Sutter Inn. It’s a Bed and breakfast place and has a great pub as well. The food portions were huge and very good. We would recommend it if your in the area.

Oh,, after we ate I wanted to use the restroom before leaving. Once I took the stairs down to the restroom and opened the door I was greeted by a nice looking young lady in a bathtub!!! It was good for a chuckle.

As soon as I walked in the bathroom I saw this lady in a tub LOL!!

As soon as I walked in the bathroom I saw this lady in a tub LOL!!

After lunch we kept strolling the streets. Diane popped into a couple small shops along the way but didn’t buy anything. Once back at the jeep we found a nice back roads route back home.

On the way home we found these guys bailing hay.I have spent countless hours on a wagon like that. Just not being pulled by horses LOL!!

On the way home we found these guys bailing hay. I have spent countless hours on a wagon like that. Just not being pulled by horses LOL!!

Our lunch was so big that we didn’t want to eat any dinner. So we took a short walk and then kicked back on the patio with a glass of wine and chilled. Another good day.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in A little about us. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Touring Ronks and Lititz

  1. Richard King says:

    Patsy and I really like to visit Amish communities. We especially enjoy the Lancaster, PA and Millersburg, OH areas. I get tired of the shops pretty quickly, but I never tire of driving the back roads watching the farm work with non-mechanized equipment, and seeing the well maintained farms. Of course, I never, never tire of the bakery shops!!!! The Amish restaurants with the family style meals are very good, too.

    It may be too late in the season, but we used to get fresh corn and heat it in the shuck in the microwave……… almost better than a candy bar!!

    In fact, we are heading that way at the beginning of October. Enjoy!

    • Dave & Diane says:

      I could see the Amish country being one of our favorite places as well. The farms are very neat as you say and the food. Well you know!! And there is still fresh corn at the Farmers Markets. We have been eating so much corn on the cob the last month that I think I’m about to turn into one.

  2. It looks like you guys are having a very nice time up in the Lancaster area. We love to browse the backroads and wander thru the little towns up there.

  3. Lar says:

    Must have been a good reason you didn’t go running across that field and take turn pulling and stacking some bales on that wagon? I had my time on the hay wagon too, and NEVER want to do that again. Looks like a great area to tour…and eat.
    lar

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s