Our last day at Stonewall Jackson, A tour of the Jackson Mill and a boat ride.

Monday 8/5/13 we woke to another GREAT DAY!!! The sun was shining, the air was fresh and,, well,,, it was just a good start to the day.

That's the walk bridge to the lodge.

That’s the walk bridge to the lodge.

I love it when the water is like glass!!

I love it when the water is like glass!!

So we,, you guessed it,, did our normal morning walk’s and bike rides before jumping in the Jeep and heading out on a 20 mile drive to Jackson’s  Mill.

Colonel Edward Jackson, a Revolutionary War figure, originally settled the mill on the West Fork River in 1800. Three generations of Jackson’s operated mills at this site which had saw and grist mills, a carpenter shop, blacksmith forge, quarters for twelve slaves, numerous barns/outbuildings, and a general store on 1500 acres of prime forest and pasture land.

Six year old Thomas Jackson and his four year old sister Laura came here as orphans in 1830 to live with their step-grandmother Elizabeth Jackson and their uncle Cummins Jackson. Thomas lived here until leaving for West Point in 1842.

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Tom and Laura remained close throughout their lives until, like so many families, they found themselves on opposite sides of the Civil War. Laura opened her house in Beverly, WV to Union troops as a hospital. Thomas joined the Confederacy and became immortalized at the First Battle of Bull Run as the general the world would know as “Stonewall”.

Cummins Jackson died with no last will and testament. Over the years, the Jackson farmstead was divided and passed through several hands. In 1921, property that included the original Jackson homestead was given to West Virginia University to establish a youth facility.

Once we arrived we found out that the area was actually closed but when the ladies in the office asked if we drove very far to tour it and I said Oregon I thought they were going to die LOL!!!

I did tell them that we were really just passing through but they said to by all means take a tour of the buildings. We couldn’t get inside but we didn’t have to pay the normal entry fee either so it turned out ok.

While walking to the historic site we ran across some students practicing the drums so we stood around and listened for a little while. There were really good.

They sounded pretty darn good!!

They sounded pretty darn good!!

Once we arrived at the actual historic area we had to walk in front of the general store and noticed a checker board set up with a couple chairs just calling our names. So how could we resist such a nice setting on the porch right next to a pond with absolutely no one else around for us to enjoy a rip roaring game of checkers.

We saw a checker board sitting on the patio of the general store so we HAD to sit and play a game.

We saw a checker board sitting on the patio of the general store so we HAD to sit and play a game.

Here are some pictures of the area.

Blaker's Mill Pond provides the water for operating Blaker's. While the mill is operating water is pumped from the West Fork River at the rate of 2000gpm. The water passes through the turbine and then is returned to the river.

Blaker’s Mill Pond provides the water for operating Blaker’s. While the mill is operating water is pumped from the West Fork River at the rate of 2000gpm. The water passes through the turbine and then is returned to the river.

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Blacksmith Shop

Blacksmith Shop

Blaker's Mill

Blaker’s Mill

Jackson's Mill

Jackson’s Mill

Jackson's Mill. His house can be seen in the background but is no longer there.

Jackson’s Mill. His house can be seen in the background but is no longer there.

Blaker's Mill with the Blacksmith Shop in the background.

Blaker’s Mill with the Blacksmith Shop in the background.

The hewn-log McWhorter Cabin measures 18 feet by 24 feet and is markedly different from modern-day log houses because its chimney is built inside the walls as protection from Indian attacks. An outside chimney could conceivably be knocked in, exposing a gaping hole and rendering the occupants defenseless. McWhorter and his family lived in this cabin for 37 years, during which time it served a variety of functions including post office, church, and meeting house.

The hewn-log McWhorter Cabin measures 18 feet by 24 feet and is markedly different from modern-day log houses because its chimney is built inside the walls as protection from Indian attacks. An outside chimney could conceivably be knocked in, exposing a gaping hole and rendering the occupants defenseless. McWhorter and his family lived in this cabin for 37 years, during which time it served a variety of functions including post office, church, and meeting house.

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After we took our self guided tour we headed into Weston for some lunch. We went to a place called Second and Center Café. If you are ever in the area we would highly recommend it.

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Then we headed home and had time to relax for a while before walking across the walk bridge and taking a boat tour on the lake. It was a great evening for a boat ride.

We had a nice boat ride. We should have done this every night.

We had a nice boat ride. We should have done this every night.

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After our boat ride Diane walked Jack while I started putting things away in preparation of our travel day Tuesday. Yep it’s time to leave Stonewall Jackson Resort. We really enjoyed our stay here. Heck they even brought us a newspaper every morning. We felt pretty spoiled for being in a State Park. But it’s time to move on and see new things.

Wednesday we will head into Pennsylvania!!! It will be a 150 mile travel day to Bedford Pa. Diane has been doing some research and has a bunch of stuff planned for us there the way it sounds. Should be fun!!

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