Travel day to Oklahoma City

Well today was travel day. Time to leave Foss Lake State Park and head to Oklahoma City and get our jack.

Last walk around the Foss Lake

Last walk around the Foss Lake

Even though we had a appointment for 1pm and we had a 2 plus hour drive I wanted to get on the road by 9. You just never what will happen and being early never hurts.

So we hit the dump station then headed for fuel and then on the road. It was a drizzly day but all in all not horrible.

OF course our GPS would not recognize the address to AAA Fiberglass,, the shop that had our jack so we used the directions we got from Mapquest. Heading into a large city like Oklahoma City I sure wanted to have the GPS coincide with mapquest so I felt better about the drive but it just wasn’t meant to be.

But our directions were spot on and Diane did a great job of co-pilot so we made it there with no problem. But once again,,, I hate large cities.

We pulled in AAA just before 11am. I went in and told them that I knew I was early and just wanted to let them know I was there and would be happy to park someplace out of the way until our appointment time at 1.

They said no problem,,, we will get on ya now!!! Perfect!! See,,, being early can’t hurt and sometimes it can really help. .

It took them about a hour to install the jack with no real problems. Except after the install the jacks still didn’t want to work. So I called Tiffin and they ran me through the process to reverse the procedure they had me due to fool the system a few days ago. Once we did that all was good and we was on our way shortly after noon headed to the Twin Fountains RV Resort. A BIG THANKS to AAA Fiberglass for all the help. Tiffin had good things to say about them and I see why

Twin Fountains is a nice park and is a good spot to be to tour the city but it is triangulated between a couple freeways and a busy road. But it is close to everything we want to see.

Once we got set up we headed out to get a little lunch and to go to the  Oklahoma State Firefighters Museum. It’s only about 2 miles from the campground.

IMG_4992 IMG_4991 IMG_4988

On April 6, 1967 a groundbreaking ceremony was held at 2716 N.E. 50th St., in Oklahoma City, where the Oklahoma State Firefighters Museum is still located today. The building was completed in 1969 and houses the Museum and the offices of the Oklahoma State Firefighters Association (OSFA), Oklahoma Fire Chiefs Association (OCFA) and the Oklahoma Retired Firefighters Association (ORFA).

1921 Stitz Fire Engine. This is a 500 gpm Triple Combination Pumper

1921 Stitz Fire Engine. This is a 500 gpm Triple Combination Pumper

Inside the 1919 Seagraves Pumper

Inside the 1919 Seagraves Pumper

1919 Seagraves Pumper. It's a triple combination pumper meaning it carried water, hose and a pump.

1919 Seagraves Pumper. It’s a triple combination pumper meaning it carried water, hose and a pump.

1928 Southern 750 Pimper. This was Oklahomas first automotive fire apparatus

1928 Southern 750 Pimper. This was Oklahomas first automotive fire apparatus

1920 Stutz Fire truck

1920 Stutz Fire truck

1920 Stutz Fire truck

1920 Stutz Fire truck

The Museum contains a remarkable collection of antique fire apparatus and equipment dating back to the mid-1700s, including the first fire station built in, what was then, Oklahoma Territory in 1869. Other exhibits include the world’s largest fire department patch collection and a one-of-a-kind mural, The Last Alarm. The Museum is the new home to several artifacts from the Ben Franklin Collection, a group of items representing the birth of the oldest fire department in the United States.

These are wooden water lines. They helped with the water moving across town. Better than the old water brigade

These are wooden water lines. They helped with the water moving across town. Better than the old water brigade.

1928 Chevrolet Chemical Hose Truck. This was Fort Cobb Oklahoma's first piece of motorized fire apparatus. In service from 1928 to 1941

1928 Chevrolet Chemical Hose Truck. This was Fort Cobb Oklahoma’s first piece of motorized fire apparatus. In service from 1928 to 1941

Horse Drawn steam engine that weighed well over 5000lbs

Horse Drawn steam engine that weighed well over 5000lbs

Gamewell Alarm System

Gamewell Alarm System

1890 Hand Drawn Chemical Cart. It has twin 20 gal. tanks that would contain water, soda and a small container of acid which combined to expel the water used in extinguishing the fire. Used in Hunter Oklahoma from 1890 to 1910

1890 Hand Drawn Chemical Cart. It has twin 20 gal. tanks that would contain water, soda and a small container of acid which combined to expel the water used in extinguishing the fire. Used in Hunter Oklahoma from 1890 to 1910

The Museum is one of the most outstanding facilities in the nation devoted to the preservation and display of antique fire fighting equipment and apparatus. Owned and operated by the Oklahoma State Firefighters Association, it is financed by membership dues.

We really had a good time at the museum and probably could have spent a little more time there but they close at 4:30 and the lights were going out so we took the hint LOL!!.

After the Firefighter Museum we headed over to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum but they were going to close at 5:30 so we decided to hold of until tomorrow. So we just took a short drive around and then headed home for the evening.

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